3S Landscape Design

May

May has been a busy time in the garden, as in Perth it is both harvest time and the start of the growing season for many plants, a bit like Spring in the northern hemisphere as the rains hopefully come and the weather cools, Dieran in the Noongar calendar.

I have finally poached the quinces I harvested in late April. I use a recipe from Stephanie Alexander’s book (the Cook’s Companion) which requires about six hours in a moderate oven in an enamel baking dish. The result is the most wonderful fragrance throughout the house and the quince turn from hard yellow/green to a glorious crimson. It is quite hard work to cut the quince up and core them and I have found it is fine to leave the skin on rather than peeling them as recommended, which is very tedious!

  • Quinces and pears from the tree Quinces and pears from the tree
  • Poaching quince Poaching quince
  • Yum!!! Yum!!!
  • Granny Smiths still ripening Granny Smiths still ripening


The poached quince can be frozen for use as dessert, in a nut and quince cake or for a decadent breakfast (they are wonderful with porridge). The Granny Smith and Pink Lady apples are slow to ripen this year.

In the native garden many shrubs and trees are flowering, providing energy for birds as they select their mates.
Some of the wonderful small trees flowering in my garden include Eucalyptus kruseana, the first flowering since I planted it last year, and Hakea laurinia, the fabulous pincushion hakea, as well as Eucalyptus woodwardii and the Silver Princess. Its lovely that the trees are now tall enough to enjoy from the second floor windows and I can watch the bees and birds buzzing around the flowers.

Some of the smaller things flowering include Beaufortia squarrossa with its fabulous red, Grevillea pimeloides and Calytrix tetragona. I am particularly enjoying a purple thryptomene, Thryptomene strongylophylla. I bought it at one of the Kings Park sales because I love purple flowers but was still surprised to see how lovely it really is in flower. Unfortunately the photo doesn’t really do it justice.

  • Hakea laurinia bursting from its bud Hakea laurinia bursting from its bud
  • Almost fully open Almost fully open
  • Eucalytpus kruseana Eucalytpus kruseana
  • Grevillea pimeloides Grevillea pimeloides
  • Calytrix tetragona Calytrix tetragona
  • Thryptomene strongylophylla Thryptomene strongylophylla
  • A difficult to photograph purple.... A difficult to photograph purple....
  • Beaufortia squarrossa Beaufortia squarrossa

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